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What’s the point of graphene?

Graphene is ultra-thin, flexible, electrically conductive and transparent. Credit: Shutterstock/ Artbox
Graphene is ultra-thin, flexible, electrically conductive and transparent. Credit: Shutterstock/ Artbox

Removing carbon dioxide from natural gas to reduce emissions, creating biosensors to detect molecules and enhancing night vision goggles – the potential applications of graphene seem endless.

But what are the biggest challenges in getting the one-atom-thick material out of the lab and onto the factory floor?

This September, Horizon talks to scientists who are turning graphene into membranes that can strip impurities from water, and we find out how one of the big hurdles is working out how to grade graphene.

And we hear from the scientific director of graphene-maker Graphenea, who believes that the graphene market could be extremely attractive for companies once applications start to come online.

In 2013, the EU launched the EUR 1 billion Graphene Flagship - its biggest-ever research initiative - with the goal of developing applications for graphene within a decade by bringing together researchers from academia and business.

For more information http://graphene-flagship.eu/