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Out on the ice – science in the Arctic

The Polarstern is currently one of the most sophisticated polar research vessels in the world. The ship is equipped for biological, geological, geophysical, glaciological, chemical, oceanographic and meteorological research, and contains nine research laboratories. The ship has a crew of at most 44, and offers work facilities for a further 50 scientists and technicians. Photo: Mar Fernandez, Alfred Wegener Institute
The Polarstern is currently one of the most sophisticated polar research vessels in the world. The ship is equipped for biological, geological, geophysical, glaciological, chemical, oceanographic and meteorological research, and contains nine research laboratories. The ship has a crew of at most 44, and offers work facilities for a further 50 scientists and technicians. Photo: Mar Fernandez, Alfred Wegener Institute

From the DNA of ancient diseases frozen in the permafrost to the relationship between global warming and the scramble to access vast oil deposits under the Arctic - in January Horizon looks at science that is taking researchers out onto the ice.

We hear from Dr Marc von Hobe, coordinator of the EU-funded RECONCILE project, which helped with the first ever detection of a hole in the ozone layer over the Arctic. He argues that more work needs to be done to control greenhouse gas emissions.

Horizon also talks to the scientists aiming to set up a European Arctic observing network in Svalbard, an island halfway between the north of Norway and the North Pole.