Directorate-General for Research & Innovation logo Horizon: the EU Research & Innovation magazine | European Commission logo
Receive our editor’s picks

EUROfusion launched in Brussels to help turn fusion energy into a reality

The launch of EUROfusion is an important milestone, said European Commission Vice-President responsible for energy, Günther H. Oettinger, while speaking at the event on 9 October.
The launch of EUROfusion is an important milestone, said European Commission Vice-President responsible for energy, Günther H. Oettinger, while speaking at the event on 9 October.

Fusion research institutes from around Europe gathered in Brussels to mark the signing of a grant between the EU and the EUROfusion consortium that will help keep Europe’s lead in fusion energy research.

EUROfusion represents a major change in the way fusion research is funded in Europe. From 2014 to 2018, research will be funded through the Euratom Horizon 2020 fusion energy research programme, in line with Europe’s fusion energy roadmap, which aims to deliver electricity generated by fusion to the grid by 2050.

Nuclear fusion uses the same energy that powers the sun – heating hydrogen atoms to millions of degrees Celsius so that they fuse together into helium, generating energy in the process.

‘We are at the beginning of an exciting new journey with the launch of EUROfusion,’ said Vice-President responsible for energy, Günther H. Oettinger during the launch event in Brussels on 9 October.

‘Fusion has the potential to become a reliable, safe, non-CO2 emitting and sustainable energy source. Today’s launching of our European Joint Programme on fusion shows how Europe benefits if we unite our research strength.’

ITER

At the moment, countries representing over half the world’s population are working to build the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) – in the south of France.

‘We are at the beginning of an exciting new journey.’

Vice-President responsible for energy, Günther H. Oettinger

If they are successful Europe plans to go on and build a demonstration reactor, known for the moment as DEMO, which is expected to start contributing energy to the power grid around 2050.

‘This is a very pivotal time for us to be in fusion,’ Professor Steve Cowley, Chief Executive of the UK-based Culham Centre for Fusion Energy, told the meeting in Brussels. ‘I believe that this (ITER) is the most important experiment of the twenty-first century.’

Fusion technology could be able to meet a large proportion of the world’s energy demand in a cost-effective way. Unlike fission, which powers the nuclear reactors used today, fusion does not produce long-lived radioactive waste and is not subject to the same safety concerns.

More info